Adoption of the Constitution of 1857 and 1917

Adoption of the Constitution of 1857 and 1917

Constitution

This day celebrates the Adoption of the Constitution of the United Mexican States of 1857 and 1917. It is a Full Staff flag flying day.

BackgroundConstitution 1

After much heated debate congress adopted the 1857 constitution, however there was continued debate and anger over many of the articles, particularly those that were viewed as against the Catholic Church.

The main articles were:

  • No civil or ecclesiastical corporation has the capacity to acquire and manage real estate, except buildings to service or purpose of the institution
  • Obligation of the citizens
  • Definition of Mexican Nationality
  • Restated abolition of Slavery
  • Free tuition
  • Freedom of Speech
  • Right to bear arms
  • Freedom of vocation
  • Freedom from Special Courts
  • Titles of Nobility were not recognized
  • Prohibition of beatings, mutilation or torture
  • No civil or ecclesiastical corporation has the capacity to acquire and manage real estate, except buildings to service or purpose of the institution
  • Abolition of death penalty is reserved only for traitor to the homeland, highwaymen, arsonists, parricide and homicide with the aggravating circumstance of treachery, premeditation or advantage. As well as crimes of the military or piracy.

The reaction to these laws was predictably volatile. The Church rebelled as did the conservative fractions. A general rebellion began and eventually the country was ruled by Maximillian and the Second Mexican Empire. Maximillian was killed, Benito Juarez was released from prison and overthrew the government.

In 1917 during the Mexican Revolution the 1917 Constitution was adopted. It is the first constitution in the world to embed social rights. Major additions included establishing the bases for a free, mandatory, and secular education, foundation of land reform and empowerment of the labor sector.

It seriously restricted the influence of the Roman Catholic Church and continued to be controversial and provocative.  

Calendar

See More Mexican Holidays Here

 

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons