Los Mochis Sinaloa

Los Mochis Sinaloa

Los mochis map  Los mochiscoa“Place of Turtles”

The city of Los Mochis is a relatively new city in Mexico but has quickly developed into a commercial center for the large agricultural area in the basin of the El Fuerte River. It has become a transportation hub for Northwestern Mexico situated on the border between the two states of Sinaloa and Sonora. It is also the Pacific rail terminus for the Chihuahua-Pacific Railroad, and is sometimes referred to as the “Gateway to the Copper Canyon.” Los Mochis  is also the main terminal for ferries to the Baja linking to the Capital of the Baja Sur, La Paz, with the mainland,

Los Mochis Fast Facts

Location – Strategically located on the coast of the Sea of Cortez in the northwest corner of the state of Sinaloa.

Weather – Semi-arid. Extremely hot summers with very high humidity. Warm winters with little if no rainfall.

January average Highs 37C (98F) Lows 12C (55F)

July average Highs 43C (110F) Lows 23.9C (75F)

Los mochis map1Population – 257,00

Elevation – 10 m (30 ft)

Founded – 1893 by a group of American utopian socialists

Medical – Many hospitals, doctors, dentists

Money – Banks and ATMs

Airport – Los Mochis International Airport  or Valle del Fuerte Federal International Airport has a terminal building and parking for 3 commercial aircraft.

History:

Los Mochis was founded by Americans in the late 1800’s; one group under Albert Kinney Owen (a civil engineer) was organized under the principals of utopian socialism an envisaged a perfect  cooperative colony. Owen started the Texas, Topolobampo and Pacific Railroad and Telegraph Company and called the now town of Topolobampo “Ciudad González”. He sold bonds to build a railway and city and in 1886 the settlement began. Two years later 300 colonists arrived from New York and by 1892 over 1200 colonist had arrived and tried – but failed – to develop a large agricultural based community. The development was all but abandoned by 1893 and most of the colonist moved back to the US.

The other founder was Benjamin F. Johnston, a capitalist who wanted to develop and exploit the natural resources of the area. A quick business man he developed the sugar industry by starting a sugar mill for the area in 1898. Rapid growth followed and the town grew rapidly. Johnston built factories, an airport, church, lighthouse and dam. He owned or was a major partner in over 20 different companies. He mapped out the city plans and founded what is known as Los Mochis today. When he died in 1937, his family returned to the US.

Los Mochis has prospered and is the commercial center for the most prosperous agricultural area in the country.

 

Festivals

Things to See and Do

Sinaloa Park and Botanical Gardens: Previously the site of Johnson’s home. Includes domestic as well as foreign plats and tree.

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The Regional Museum of the El Fuerte Valley

Six exhibition rooms and a petroglyph mural.

Ph. (+52-668) 812-4692

Bird watching: Thousands of migratory birds such as ducks and Canada geese, white-winged dove, the quail and come to this region. Ask for guides at your hotel.

Sports fishing –Deep-sea fishing arrangements for  marlin, wahoo, and dorado can be made in Topolobampo. Freshwater fishing opportunities are available near the dams.

Copper Canyon: Arrangements can be made to take a unique rail trip from Los Mochis to the Copper Canyon. – said to be eleven times the size of the Grand Canyon in the US.

Chepe (Chihuahua al Pacifico scenic train, which goes to the Sierra Tarahumara). out Los Mochis-Chihuahua: 6:00 hrs. Arrive in Los Mochis: 19:50 hrs. Tickets and information: Ferromex, tel. 8.24.11.51

 

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Port of Topolobampo

Go to the port and enjoy a tour of the area.Visit the walrus sanctuary, enjoy the seafood!

Accommodation

Hotel

Los Mochis Hotels

RV Parks Los Mochis

Los Mochis Copper Canyon RV Park

 

Directions:

Los Mochis is located on Highway 15 in the Northern Area of the State of Sinaloa.

You can also reach Los Mochis via a ferry from La Paz or by air.

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